Freephone: 0808 281 1545   |   Email: enquiries@redstonewills.co.uk

1. Are you married or in a civil partnership?

Yes No

2. Do you have children*†?

Yes No

2. Do you have children*†?

Yes No

Yes married / Yes children

Spouse / Civil Partner Gets...

Children Get...

Yes married / No children

Spouse / Civil Partner Gets All

No married / Yes children

Children Get All. Shared Equally

3. Do you have Parents Living?

Yes No

No married / No children / Yes Parents

4. Do you have Siblings?

Yes No

No married / No children / No Parents / Yes Siblings

5. Do you have Grandparents living?

Yes No

No married / No children / No Parents / No Siblings / Yes Grandparents

6. Do you have Aunts or Uncles?

Yes No

No married / No children / No Parents / No Siblings / No Grandparents / Yes Aunts

No married / No children / No Parents / No Siblings / No Grandparents / No Aunts

Reset

  • * The term children includes illegitimate and adopted children, but not step-children.
  • † If those relatives were not living at the date of your death but they left descendants who are, then those descendants would usually inherit the share their parent would have taken had they survived you.
  • Please note that this information is provided as a guide and only summarises the laws relating to intestacy in England and Wales as at October 2014. This page illustrates the new rules set out in the Inheritance and Trustees’ Powers Act 2014.

For you...

Your spouse or civil partner will receive:

  • personal possessions;
  • the first £250,000
  • together with interest on that amount from the date of death; and
  • one half of anything that remains.
  • Your children*† will recieve the other half of anything that remains.

Did you know:

  • Your spouse or civil partner will receive £250k
  • Many customers like to avoid the complication of this situation by putting a Will in place.
  • You can also protect your children’s inheritance with a life interest trust protecting your estate and their inheritance for future events such as divorce or re-marriage with a Will.
  • Did you know with a Will you can also appoint Guardians for you children should you pass away before they reach the age of 18. If you do not have a Will in place the authorities will decide who is best placed to be the Guardians of your children.
  • Regardless of your situation a Will gives you piece of mind as the rules that govern what happens without a Will are subject to changes in the future.

Your spouse or civil partner will receive everything.

Did you know:

  • You may want to leave a gift or a personal item to friend or family member in a Will or a legacy to a charity.
  • A Will also allows you to state your funeral wishes, make an allowance for any future children and appoint someone who will deal with your estate when the time comes.
  • Regardless of your situation a Will gives you piece of mind as the rules that govern what happens without a Will are subject to changes in the future.

Everything is shared equally between your children*†.

Did you know:

  • Did you know with a Will you can also appoint Guardians for your children should you pass away before they reach the age of 18. If you do not have a Will in place the authorities will decide who is best placed to be the Guardians of your children.
  • Unmarried partners have no automatic right to inherit, a Will is the only way to make sure your partner receives what you want them to receive.
  • Regardless of your situation a Will gives you piece of mind as the rules that govern what happens without a Will are subject to changes in the future.

Everything is shared equally between your parents.

Did you know:

  • You may want to leave a gift or a personal item to friend or family member in a Will or a legacy to a charity.
  • A Will also allows you to state your funeral wishes, make an allowance for any future children and appoint someone who will deal with your estate when the time comes.
  • Regardless of your situation a Will gives you piece of mind as the rules that govern what happens without a Will are subject to changes in the future.

Everything is shared equally between your full siblings.
If there are no full siblings then equally between your half siblings.

Did you know:

  • You may want to leave a gift or a personal item to friend or family member in a Will or a legacy to a charity.
  • A Will also allows you to state your funeral wishes, make an allowance for any future children and appoint someone who will deal with your estate when the time comes.
  • Regardless of your situation a Will gives you piece of mind as the rules that govern what happens without a Will are subject to changes in the future.

Everything is shared equally between your grandparents.

Did you know:

Everything is shared equally between your full aunts and uncles. If there are no full aunts and uncles then equally between your half aunts and uncles.

Did you know:

  • You may want to leave a gift or a personal item to friend or family member in a Will or a legacy to a charity.
  • A Will also allows you to state your funeral wishes, make an allowance for any future children and appoint someone who will deal with your estate when the time comes.
  • Regardless of your situation a Will gives you piece of mind as the rules that govern what happens without a Will are subject to changes in the future.

Everything passes to the Crown.

Did you know:

Redstone Wills can provide you with a cost effective Will to make sure your assets don't end up at the treasury

Make sure the ones you love know where they stand, share our quiz today


  • * The term children includes illegitimate and adopted children, but not step-children.
  • † If those relatives were not living at the date of your death but they left descendants who are, then those descendants would usually inherit the share their parent would have taken had they survived you.
  • Please note that this information is provided as a guide and only summarises the laws relating to intestacy in England and Wales as at October 2014. This page illustrates the new rules set out in the Inheritance and Trustees’ Powers Act 2014.